Press

NEW INSTALLATION FEATURES PEM'S
WORLD-CLASS NATIVE AMERICAN ART COLLECTION 

Raven1

Raven's Many Gifts: Native Art of the Northwest Coast
On view through mid-2015

SALEM, MA -- The Peabody Essex Museum (PEM) is pleased to present a new installation drawn from the museum's Native American art collection - the oldest, most comprehensive ongoing collection of its kind in the Western hemisphere. Raven's Many Gifts: Native Art of the Northwest Coast celebrates the rich artistic legacy of Native artists along the Pacific Northwest Coast while exploring dynamic relationships among humans, animals, ancestors and supernatural beings. Featuring nearly 30 works from the 19th century to present day, the installation includes superlative examples of works on paper, wood carvings, textiles, films, music and jewelry.  Raven's Many Gifts is on view through mid-2015.

"Raven, an iconic trickster and culture hero who appears in countless Northwest Coast origin stories, is credited with carrying light into the world in his beak," says Karen Kramer, PEM's curator of Native American art and culture. "Despite profound cultural changes over the past 200 years, oral histories such as the story of Raven continue to inspire a rich and diverse array of creative expression in tribal communities along the Northwest Coast."

raven2

Raven's Many Gifts juxtaposes historic and contemporary works while exploring the continuity and evolution of aesthetic traditions and iconographic forms. Many works in the installation, including a 19th century carved raven hat from northern British Columbia, employ formlines - bands of color that outline a figure or create an abstract motif.  Formlines and raven motifs also feature prominently in Nicholas Galanin's 2006 video work, Tsu Heidei Shugaxtutaan (We Will Again Open This Container of Wisdom That Has Been Left in Our Care).  In this two-part video Galanin opens a dialogue between past and present. In Part I, the non-Native hip-hop dancer David "Elsewhere" Bernal free-forms to the sound of traditional Tlingit chanting and drums. In Part II, Tlingit dancer Dan Littlefield, wearing full regalia and carrying a raven rattle, moves in traditional ways to the electronic beats composed by Galanin.

Raven's Many Gifts features ceremonial regalia, trade goods and contemporary works for art galleries representing tribal communities across the Northwest coast, including Kwakwaka'wakw, Tsimshian, Haida, Interior Salish, Hesquiat First Nation and Tlingit. Organized around the themes of Living Stories, Family Connections and Market Innovations, this installation explores Native art of the Northwest coast through the lens of ritual, ceremony, family identity and adaptation.

IMAGES:
Heiltsuk (Bella Bella), Mask, c. 1845. Central coast, British Columbia. Wood, pigment. H: 13 in, W: 12 1/2 in Gift of Mr. Edward S. Moseley, 1978. E28575
Nicholas Galanin (Tlingit and Aleut), Tsu Heidei Shugaxtutaan (We Will Again Open This Container of Wisdom That Has Been Left in Our Care), Parts I and II, 2006. Born 1979, Sitka, Alaska. Digital video: Part I, 4 minutes, 36 seconds; Part II, 4 minutes, 6 seconds. Museum purchase, 2012. 2012.25.1.

ABOUT THE PEABODY ESSEX MUSEUM

The Peabody Essex Museum (PEM) is one of the oldest and fastest growing museums in North America. At its heart is a mission to transform people's lives by broadening their perspectives, attitudes and knowledge of themselves and the wider world. PEM celebrates outstanding artistic and cultural creativity through exhibitions, programming and special events that emphasize cross-cultural connections and the vital importance of creative expression. Founded in 1799, the museum's collection is among the finest of its kind boasting superlative works from around the globe and across time -- including American art and architecture, Asian export art, photography, maritime art and history, as well as Native American, Oceanic and African art. PEM's campus affords a varied and unique visitor experience with hands-on creativity zones, interactive opportunities, performance spaces and historic properties, including Yin Yu Tang: A Chinese House, a 200-year-old house that is the only example of Chinese domestic architecture on display in the United States. HOURS: Open Tuesday-Sunday, 10 am-5 pm and the third Thursday of every month until 9 pm. Closed Mondays (except holidays), Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year's Day. ADMISSION: Adults $18; seniors $15; students $10. Additional admission to Yin Yu Tang: $5. Members, youth 17 and under and residents of Salem enjoy free general admission and free admission to Yin Yu Tang. INFO: Call 866-745-1876 or visit our Web site at www.pem.org

 

 

PR Contacts:

Whitney Van Dyke  -  Manager of Public Relations  -  978-745-9500 X3228  -  whitney_vandyke@pem.org

Dinah Cardin  -  Press Officer / Special Projects Writer  -  978-745-9500 x3230  -  dinah_cardin@pem.org

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